| 
  • If you are citizen of an European Union member nation, you may not use this service unless you are at least 16 years old.

  • Want to organize your cloud files? Sign up for a free webinar to see how Dokkio (a new product from PBworks) can help you find, organize, and collaborate on your Drive, Gmail, Dropbox, and Slack files: Weds, May 27 at 2PM Eastern / 11AM Pacific
View
 

China

Page history last edited by Mike 8 years, 3 months ago

In 2010, after 30 years of dramatic growth, China surpassed Japan to become the world’s second largest economy after ours. China’s size in land and in population, its rapid economic growth, and its sharply increasing military expenditures are dramatically changing the strategic map of the world. While the potential for conflict with an authoritarian China could rise as its power grows, the United States must pursue policies designed to encourage Beijing to embark on a course that makes conflict less likely. China must be discouraged from attempting to intimidate or dominate neighboring states. If the present Chinese regime is permitted to establish itself as the preponderant power in the Western Pacific it could close off large parts of the region to cooperative relations with the United States and the West and dim hope that economic opportunity and democratic freedom will continue to flourish across East Asia. Mitt Romney will implement a strategy that makes the path of regional hegemony for China far more costly than the alternative path of becoming a responsible partner in the international system.

 

Maintain Robust Military Capabilities in the Pacific

In the face of China’s accelerated military build-up, the United States and our allies must maintain appropriate military capabilities to discourage any aggressive or coercive behavior by China against its neighbors. Maintaining a strong military presence in the Pacific is not an invitation to conflict. Quite the contrary; it is a guarantor of a region where trade routes are open and East Asia’s community of nations remains secure and prosperous.

Toward that end, the United States should maintain and expand its naval presence in the Western Pacific. We should be assisting partners that require help to enhance their defensive capabilities. The Department of Defense should reconsider recent decisions not to sell top-of-the-line equipment to our closest Asian allies. We should be coordinating with Taiwan to determine its military needs and supplying them with adequate aircraft and other military platforms. We should be assisting Pacific nations to enhance maritime domain awareness, i.e., the ability to employ radar and other detection networks to monitor aggressive behavior in disputed waters. This would minimize the chance of surprise confrontations and prevent military miscalculations that can escalate into larger conflicts.

 

Deepen Cooperation Among Regional Partners

We need to continue to strengthen alliances and relations with strategic partners like India and build stronger ties to influential countries like Indonesia. Our aim should be to work with all these countries bilaterally but also to encourage them to work with one another as they have begun to do. Our objective is not to build an anti-China coalition. Rather it is to strengthen cooperation among countries with which we share a concern about China’s growing power and increasing assertiveness and with whom we also share an interest in maintaining freedom of navigation and ensuring that disputes over resources are resolved by peaceful means. It is yet another way of closing off China’s option of expanding its influence through coercion.

As detailed in his book, Believe in America, Mitt Romney will also pursue deeper economic cooperation among like-minded nations around the world that are genuinely committed to the principles of open markets through the formation of a “Reagan Economic Zone.” The benefits of this zone — which will codify principles of free trade — will be a powerful magnet that draws in an expanding circle of nations seeking greater access to other markets. Although China is unlikely to accede to the Reagan Economic Zone given its current approach to trade, offering Beijing the possibility of participation will give China significant incentives to end its abusive commercial practices. But with or without China as a member, the Reagan Economic Zone will establish a system of trade that could knit together the entire region, discouraging imbalanced bilateral trade relations between China and its neighbors, limiting China’s ability to coerce other countries, and ultimately encouraging China to participate in free trade on fair terms.

 

Defend Human Rights

Any serious U.S. policy toward China must confront the fact that China’s regime continues to deny its people basic political freedoms and human rights. A nation that represses its own people cannot be a trusted partner in an international system based on economic and political freedom. While it is obvious that any lasting democratic reform in China cannot be imposed from the outside, it is equally obvious that the Chinese people currently do not yet enjoy the requisite civil and political rights to turn internal dissent into effective reform. The United States has an important role to play in encouraging the evolution of China toward a more politically open and democratic order.

If the United States fails to support dissidents out of fear of offending the Chinese government, we will merely embolden China’s leaders. We certainly should not have relegated the future of freedom to second or third place, as Secretary of State Clinton did in 2009 when she publicly declared that the Obama administration would not let U.S. concerns about China’s human rights record interfere with cooperation “on the global economic crisis [and] the global climate change crisis.” A Romney administration will vigorously support and engage civil society groups within China that are promoting democratic reform, anti-corruption efforts, religious freedom, and women’s and minority rights. It will look to provide these groups and the Chinese people with greater access to information and communication through a stronger Internet freedom initiative. Mitt Romney will seek to engage China, but will always stand up for those fighting for the freedoms we enjoy.

Disarm North Korea

North Korea’s nuclear weapons program is a serious menace to world peace. A nuclear weapons capability in the hands of an unpredictable dictatorship with unknown leadership and an unclear chain of command poses a direct threat to U.S. forces on the Korean Peninsula and elsewhere in East Asia, threatens our close allies South Korea and Japan, destabilizes the entire Pacific region, and could lead to the illicit transfer of a nuclear device to another rogue nation or a terrorist group. As president, Mitt Romney will commit to eliminating North Korea’s nuclear weapons and its nuclear-weapons infrastructure. A key mistake in U.S. policy toward North Korea has been to grant it a series of carrots in return for only illusory cooperation. Each step the world has taken toward North Korea has been met with further provocations and expansion of its nuclear program. Over the years, North Korea has found that its pursuit of a nuclear weapon reaps it material and diplomatic rewards, taking away any incentive for it to end its program.

Mitt Romney will reverse that dynamic. The United States will make it unequivocally clear to Pyongyang that continued advancement of its nuclear program and any aggression will be punished instead of rewarded. Mitt will work with allies to institute harsher sanctions on North Korea, such as cracking down on financial institutions that service the North Korean regime and sanctioning companies that conduct commercial shipping in and out of North Korea. He will also step up enforcement of the Proliferation Security Initiative to constrain North Korean illicit exports by increasing the frequency of inspections of North Korean ships and discouraging foreign ports from permitting entry to North Korean ships. Such measures would significantly block the trade revenue that props up the North Korean regime and shut off routes by which the regime supplies its nuclear program.

China holds significant political and economic leverage over North Korea. It is not using that leverage, however, to achieve the goal of ending North Korea’s nuclear program. China fears a destabilized North Korea and the implications of its possible collapse for the region along its border. Mitt will work to persuade China to commit to North Korea’s disarmament. He will reassure China it will not be alone in dealing with the humanitarian and security issues that will arise should North Korea disintegrate. This will involve detailed planning for such an eventuality to ensure that we are ready to deal with the numerous issues that will arise if and when the North Korean regime collapses under the weight of its own economic and political contradictions. Mitt will also pursue robust military and counter-proliferation cooperation with our allies and others in the Pacific region. As the United States invigorates our relationships with South Korea, Japan, and others, and increases our collective military presence and cooperation, it should demonstrate to the Chinese that they should join the coordinated effort or be left behind as a regional counter-proliferation partner.

 

Governor Mitt Romney and China

 

Quotes from Governor Mitt Romney

"I'm not happy exporting jobs but we must move ahead in technology and patents. I don't like losing any jobs but we'll see new opportunities created selling products there. We'll have a net net increase in economic activity, just as we did with free trade," Romney said. "It's tempting to want to protect our markets and stay closed. But at some point it all comes crashing down and you're hopelessly left behind. Then you are Russia."

 

"China and India have huge populations. There's no reason why they can't emerge as an economic and military superpower in 100 years," the governor said. "We need to be at the leading edge of technology.

 

"There's a common misperception that we do all the innovation and send off the grunt work to people offshore, that somehow American technology does all the high-end work and we send out routine drafting elsewhere," Romney said. "We have the perception we're the best and the brightest but we didn't score as well as others in some studies.

 

"We know this market but when our market is no longer the target market in the world, when India and China surpass us, the idea that we'll be innovating and they'll be copying is not an accurate perception," the governor added.

 

Massachusetts Governor Mitt Romney's Message: Globalize or Die

 

 

By Paula Rooney, CRN

7:14 PM EST Wed. Nov. 16, 2005

U.S. businesses must globalize or whither away and die.

 

That's the message Massachusetts' governor and top technology executives said at the Forrester Research executive strategy summit in Boston on Wednesday.

 

Gov. Mitt Romney, a former Bain Capital venture capitalist who is mulling a presidential run in 2008, said jobs will continue to be lost to emerging economies but U.S. businesses have far more to gain by selling their products into massive markets such as China and India than they risk losing by not participating at all.

 

He advised CIOs and technology executives to stop worrying about lost jobs and concentrate on innovating globally that will grow jobs here and abroad.

 

"I'm not happy exporting jobs but we must move ahead in technology and patents. I don't like losing any jobs but we'll see new opportunities created selling products there. We'll have a net net increase in economic activity, just as we did with free trade," Romney said. "It's tempting to want to protect our markets and stay closed. But at some point it all comes crashing down and you're hopelessly left behind. Then you are Russia."

 

According to Forrester Research, only two percent of U.S. IT jobs moved offshore by 2004 and that number will increase to less than 10 percent by 2015.

 

Romney said the United States should be investing heavily in technology because it will help fuel continued economic growth over the next century. If US businesses fail to do this, he said, it will lose its leadership position to emerging economies.

 

"China and India have huge populations. There's no reason why they can't emerge as an economic and military superpower in 100 years," the governor said. "We need to be at the leading edge of technology.

 

At the conference, executives from IBM Global Services (IGS), GM, Proctor & Gamble, Samsung, Safeway, Palm, Network Technology Consulting, Avaya, Best Buy, Pitney & Bowes, WiPro and Akamai discussed the benefits and challenges they are encountering as they globalize their businesses.

 

 

IGS has established several centers for excellence around the globe to develop service capabilities they can leverage globally.

 

Avaya, for its part, is transforming its business on a global level to fight off mounting competitive pressure from startups like Vonage and Skype – and others. Avaya's domestic revenues once represented 85 percent of its total revenues. Today, that figure stand at 40 percent, said Thomas Lesica, group vice president of Global information technology and Business operations for Avaya.

 

Smaller businesses that generate less than $1 billion in annual revenues may have a tougher time getting in the global game than many of the Fortune 100 companies featured at the conference. Yet, smaller enterprises and small companies including service partners can participate in the next generation "global innovation networks" that are springing up around the world, said Navi Radjou, a vice president at Forrester Research.

 

One executive from WiPro Technologies said outsourcers are no longer just low cost services providers and have moved into lucrative services and intellectual property markets. The India-based systems integrator, for example, owns several wireless patents and is building up a portfolio of patents it will leverage.

 

WiPro has worked with software vendors and existing banking customers to build a customer-facing portal that accesses back end systems. In that case, WiPro also interacts directly with a hosting provider that hosts the bank's solution.

 

He told CRN he thinks solution providers can participate in these networks as long as they have a specialty and domain expertise in a particular vertical.

 

"We become an integrator of innovation for an ecosystem," said Theodore Forbath, chief strategist and practice leader of Global Product Strategy and Architecture Practice at WiPro Technologies. He noted that Wipro works with local integrators with specialties in mobility but will continue to also build its own IP and leverage that to extend their networks.

 

Diane Farrell, director of the McKinsey Global Institute, called for a global restructuring of all industries. While sales in the IT/Business process outsourcing market are the highest of any industry, at $3 trillion, its global trade value was $32 billion, well below steel automotive and consumer electronics businesses.

 

During his keynote, Romney warned that the U.S is unduly arrogant about its role as an innovator and that offshore engineers will surpass their counterparts here in numbers and quality without focused effort on education and innovation by private industry in conjunction with state and federal governments.

 

"There's a common misperception that we do all the innovation and send off the grunt work to people offshore, that somehow American technology does all the high-end work and we send out routine drafting elsewhere," Romney said. "We have the perception we're the best and the brightest but we didn't score as well as others in some studies.

 

"We know this market but when our market is no longer the target market in the world, when India and China surpass us, the idea that we'll be innovating and they'll be copying is not an accurate perception," the governor added.

 

 

http://sanity.blog-city.com/read/china.htm

 

Questions for Romney about China

 

  1. Katherine Jean Lopez: Governor, you recently got back from a trip to Asia. What were you doing there?
  2. Did you have qualms going to China? Katherine Jean Lopez

 

Comments (0)

You don't have permission to comment on this page.